Interval Structure Training The Best Conditioning

Our team again showed great character and determination to get a 2-2 result against Melbourne Heart last weekend. It’s the second time against a Melbourne team that we have come from 2-0 down away from home and a great illustration of the never-say-die attitude at the Club.

Our team again showed great character and determination to get a 2-2 result against Melbourne Heart last weekend. It-s the second time against a Melbourne team that we have come from 2-0 down away from home and a great illustration of the never-say-die attitude at the Club.

We now go into this week-s game against Newcastle with a very simple objective - win the game and we will secure a final-s position.

We-re at home in front of the best supporters in the competition so there-s no reason why we will not get the victory on the weekend. Newcastle is a very good team but we will be ready and prepared for what is going to be a fantastic Sunday afternoon.

The preparation for a game like this doesn-t change from our normal routine. In preparing for a season a plan must be flexible and take into account numerous scenarios. In any sport and at any level there must be a plan and this begins with the training session.

I know many of you are coaching or involved with junior teams so a basic session plan will make your job easier and the players will get more enjoyment from the training. All training should begin with a warm-up phase as this not only helps to decrease the risk of injury but also prepares a player physiologically and psychologically for the training. In most instances the ball can be utilised in the warm-up and this should be completed in approximately 10 minutes.

The next phase of training may see an increase in intensity and may involve a passing or technique orientated activity that is game related. However, with limited training time much of your training can be devoted to game play. This may vary from 2v2, 3v3, 4v4, 5v5 or 6v6 and the size of the fields can also vary. Small-sided games are very good for conditioning as it also includes use of the ball and involves movements that are specific for our game. It is best to play these games in an interval structure such as 4 x 4 minutes work with a 2-3 minute recovery, rather than a straight 30-40 minutes. All training should be completed with a cool down that can include an easy 5 minutes of active movement followed by stretching.

It will be a great game on Sunday and we need your support. If you need any further information on training etc please do not hesitate to contact me.

Dr Craig Duncan (twitter) @drcraigduncan (email) craigd@sydneyfc.com (web) www.drcraigduncan.com